Methodology

Sorting

Show all entries

(no Tag)   Extralinguistic context   Functional areas   Information technology   Linguistics   Web page  


Authorship  (Quote)

All written contributions of the VerbaAlpina website are marked by name. The abbreviation "auct." marks the author(s) of a contribution, the abbreviation "trad." the translator(s). The software is developed essentially by Florian Zacherl.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld | Susanne Oberholzer | Florian Zacherl – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Web page



Chronocoding  (Quote)



(auct. Katharina Knapp | Thomas Krefeld | Stephan Lücke)

Tags: Web page



Informant  (Quote)

The expression informant is used technically by VerbaAlpina: it unites two different things depending on the source. In the linguistic atlases, as a rule all linguistic data are transparent up to and including the speaker. In the database, these informants can be identified by an individual number (ID). They are furthermore chronocoded by the year of the data collection and geocoded by the place of the data collection. In geocodifiable dictionaries in comparison it is – as a rule – impossible to identify concrete speakers. However, VerbaAlpina assigns fictitious informants to this kind of sources too because of reasons due to the database. Each informant is assigned to a language family. This language assignment passes from the informant himself to all other linguistic data deriving from him.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Web page



Language  (Quote)

The surface of this portal will be available in several standard languages, namely (in alphabetical order) in English, French, German, Italian, Rhaeto-Romanic (Rumantsch Grischun) and Slovenian. In the case of German, Swiss and Austrian standard variants are possible depending on the author of the text. Regardless of the chosen language the user always has access to all linguistic material in all recorded dialects and languages.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Web page



Mapping  (Quote)

Mapping is a perhaps not entirely undisputed method in linguistic geography, but a well-established and proven one. It is equally for the documentation and the visualisation of spatial relations (cf. the contributions in Lameli 2010). The usual methods differ clearly in their conciseness. In the case of the so-called 'analytic' maps linguistic (part) utterances are represented so that the documentation is mainly in the foreground; the discovery of the spatial relations between the documented forms is left up to the reader. In the so-called dot distribution maps, in comparison, the spatial relations between single aspects of expression are directly expressed by the 'synthetic' symbol allocation. Quantitative relations can only be represented this way. The online mapping of VerbaAlpina occurs on a geocoded basis and combines both methods: it shows at first sight 'synthetic' maps, but allows on closer inspection access on the (part) utterance after a click on the symbol.
The heuristic potential of mapping is considerable. That is the reason why VerbaAlpina offers the option to its users to combine and accumulate different data classes from one category (e.g. several base types) or from different categories (e.g. extralinguistic and linguistic data) on synoptic maps.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Linguistics Web page Extralinguistic context



Notation  (Quote)

In the text contributions, the following, to a great extent usual principles of notation are used: linguistic forms (examples of attestations) are written in italics; the meaning is written between single quotation marks, e.g. formaggio 'cheese'. Extralinguistic categories (concepts) are depicted using upper-case letters. The difference between linguistic meaning and concept is always especially important when there is no word for certain concepts in single languages/dialects, as in the case of CHEESE OF THE LIQUID AFTER THE FIRST COAGULATION OF THE SOLID MATTERS. This is called ita. ricotta, fra sérac, Alemannic Ziger etc. However, a word in High German is missing.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Linguistics Web page



Public  (Quote)



(auct. Thomas Krefeld | Stephan Lücke)

Tags: Web page



Sources  (Quote)

In VerbaAlpina, we bring together very different sources. On the one hand, we are dealing with already published sources (atlases, dictionaries, monographs of single places) and with new sources, which have been exploited by the project itself for the first time, on the other hand. Part of these new data are collected by member of staffs, e.g. by Beatrice Colcuc, partly the crowd, i.e. individual and not personally known speakers, contributes these new data. For VerbaAlpina, only sources which deliver already geocoded or at least geocodable linguistic data, are worthy of consideration. These data, however, have to be treated systematically in a different way against the background of the typification. Utterances which are phonetically exactly transcribed are marked as "single attestation" by VerbaAlpina. It makes sense to group these single attestations according to certain criteria ('to type'). Data which the source offers in orthographic form is regarded as alredy typed: this form of notation

(auct. Thomas Krefeld | Stephan Lücke)

Tags: Web page



Synoptic Map  (Quote)

This function allows the users to select among the present single maps and fix them on synoptic combination maps according to their own interests. So, the spreading areas of any linguistic and extralinguistic feature can be visualised in connection with each other. At the same time, there is the possibility to fix these synoptic maps in zoom levels when a local context shall be demonstrated, as e.g. the [Karwendel|Karte:Karwendel]] or the dialectal continuum between Occitan, Franco-Provençal and Piedmontese in the Western Alps.

(auct. Thomas Krefeld – trad. Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Web page



System for Citing  (Quote)



(auct. Stephan Lücke | Susanne Oberholzer)

Tags: Web page